Interior view 1 - Built in 1870, The Church of the 13th Apostle is perhaps the best example of Gothic Revival Architecture.  The church’s design reflects the philosophy of “ecclesiology” that played an important role in mid 19th century church design.

The Church was originally built as a church for a rural parish in the City of Bergen. As the community developed and grew, the Church became the largest Congregation in the State of New Jersey. It became known as the “Millionaire’s Church,” as it catered to Hudson County’s wealthiest professionals.

Decades later, as the demographics of the neighborhood began to change, the church began to minister to a largely minority working class population. During this area, The Church was known for the political activism of its then pastor. 

Today, The Church still stands, but precariously. Vacated by the diocese in 1994, it has now been abandoned and left to the elements. Preservation New Jersey recognized the precarious situation and naming it to its 10 Most Endangered List in 2004. In 2006, the Episcopal Diocese allowed a salvage crew to brutally strip the church’s interior of its valuable artifacts and fixtures. To date, the Diocese has failed to take basic precautions against further damage or water infiltration.

Photo and description found at abandonedny(dot)com.

Interior view 1 - Built in 1870, The Church of the 13th Apostle is perhaps the best example of Gothic Revival Architecture. The church’s design reflects the philosophy of “ecclesiology” that played an important role in mid 19th century church design.

The Church was originally built as a church for a rural parish in the City of Bergen. As the community developed and grew, the Church became the largest Congregation in the State of New Jersey. It became known as the “Millionaire’s Church,” as it catered to Hudson County’s wealthiest professionals.

Decades later, as the demographics of the neighborhood began to change, the church began to minister to a largely minority working class population. During this area, The Church was known for the political activism of its then pastor.

Today, The Church still stands, but precariously. Vacated by the diocese in 1994, it has now been abandoned and left to the elements. Preservation New Jersey recognized the precarious situation and naming it to its 10 Most Endangered List in 2004. In 2006, the Episcopal Diocese allowed a salvage crew to brutally strip the church’s interior of its valuable artifacts and fixtures. To date, the Diocese has failed to take basic precautions against further damage or water infiltration.

Photo and description found at abandonedny(dot)com.

  1. brotherkink reblogged this from corvae
  2. corvae reblogged this from chaostheoryglass
  3. chaostheoryglass posted this